A Brand New Funk: Biofunk comes to Afrofuturism!

It all started with Steamfunk – a style of writing and visual aesthetic that combines the culture and approach to life of people of African descent with that of the Steampunk aesthetic.
Next came Dieselfunk fiction, film and fashion that combine the style and mood of Dieselpunk – Steampunk’s grittier sibling – with African and African-American inspiration. It is a name I came up with in 2012, playing off of Steamfunk.
Dieselfunk tells the exciting untold stories of people of African descent during the Jazz Age.
Think the Harlem Renaissance meets Science Fiction; think Chalky White (from Boardwalk Empire) doing battle with robots run amok in his territory; think Mob bosses, Nazis, the Tuskegee Airmen, the Tulsa Race Riots and jazz… that is Dieselfunk.
Then came Rococoa – the Age of Spring Technology and Clockwork.
Think Science Fiction and Fantasy meet Three Finger’d Jack, the pirate, Black Caesar and the Haitian Revolution. Think an afroretroistic Black Count, Nat Turner, and Stono Rebellion… that is Rococoa.
Now comes Biofunk.
Biofunk was born from Biopunk (a portmanteau of “biotechnology” or “biology” and “punk”) – a subgenre of science fiction that focuses on biotechnology. It is derived from cyberpunk, but focuses on the implications of biotechnology rather than information technology.
Biopunk is concerned with synthetic biology, bio-hackers, biotech mega-corporations, and oppressive government agencies that manipulate human DNA. Most often keeping with the dark atmosphere of cyberpunk, biopunk generally examines the dark side of genetic engineering and represents the low side of biotechnology.
What is Biofunk?
Biofunk, like Biopunk is a subgenre of science fiction, but it is closely related to Cyberfunk and its subgenre, Cybertrap, which focus on the speculative chronologically futuristic narratives that exist within the intersections of Black spaces and, in the case of Cybertrap, the aesthetics of classic trap music/culture, mixed with the tropes and world building of Cyberfunk.
Biofunk explores the triumphs and struggles of individuals or groups of African descent, long the products – or victims – of human experimentation and body modification.
Individuals are usually modified and enhanced by genetic manipulation and, central to Biofunk stories, is the belief that the next revolution will be in the field of biology; that the proper study of mankind is life; that physics and chemistry are only tools to probe living matter; and that computers are merely simulators and modelers for life.
The latest (first?) novel in the Biofunk subgenre is Initiate 16. Here is a description:
“Initiate 16 lay paralyzed, face-down on a glass table. Scores of blood-stained, shiny metallic needles, attached to snake-like arms, jutted from her back, neck, arms, legs, and even the backs of her heels. Her whole back was peeled open, revealing her spine. The bright lights in the ceiling above her shone on the slick, pink sinew of her back and upon several links of bone that composed her spine. Upon each link was carved an ancient rune – ‘the Odu’, her teacher had called them.
          She didn’t know what an Odu was but she knew it gave her power… and pain.
          The nerve-blocking chemicals coursing through her blood, bones and sinew numbed the pain, but she didn’t like them inside her body. She didn’t particularly enjoy initiation either, but it was a step closer to godhood – and only a god would dare tread where she would soon have to.”
Afrofuturism meets “Into the Badlands” meets “28 Days Later” in this post-apocalyptic, Biofunk thriller.
Ikoko, a physically weak, abused and psychologically disturbed young woman is selected against her will to become the first physically-enhanced hunter of “mutes” – people infected with the horrific Midway Mutagen. If the procedures go well, Ikoko will be transformed into the first of many Ologun – human killing machines – through genetic engineering, but such a powerful creature must be controlled and she will be… via an invasive memory-implantation program.
But the plan goes awry when the products of a top-secret project gone wrong, break out of the facility where they are being held and flee into the nearby city of Atlagos.
In the ensuing panic, the scientist in charge of implanting Ikoko’s memories inserts a program of her own making and turns Ikoko into a modern-day African warrior – part Shaka Zulu, part Mino (“Dahomey Amazon”).
Ikoko must face monsters – of meat, metal and combinations of both – to save herself, those she’s tasked with protecting, and maybe even a world gone absolutely mad.
Pick up your copy of Initiate 16 NOW in e-book and paperback formats!

Afrofuturism meets Post-Apocalypse with Initiate 16!

“Initiate 16 lay paralyzed, face-down on a glass table. Scores of blood-stained, shiny metallic needles, attached to snake-like arms, jutted from her back, neck, arms, legs, and even the backs of her heels.  Her whole back was peeled open, revealing her spine.  The bright lights in the ceiling above her shone on the slick, pink sinew of her back and upon several links of bone that composed her spine. Upon each link was carved an ancient rune – “the Odu,” her teacher had called them.

She didn’t know what an Odu was but she knew it gave her power… and pain.

The nerve-blocking chemicals coursing through her blood, bones and sinew numbed the pain, but she didn’t like them inside her body.   She didn’t particularly enjoy initiation either, but it was a step closer to godhood – and only a god would dare tread where she would soon have to.”

Afrofuturism meets “Into the Badlands” meets “28 Days Later” in this post-apocalyptic, biopunk thriller.

It’s the year 2057. Ikoko, a physically weak, abused and psychologically disturbed young woman is selected against her will to become the first physically-enhanced hunter of “mutes” – people infected with the horrific Midway Mutagen. If the procedures go well, Ikoko will be transformed into the first of many Ologun – human killing machines – through genetic engineering. But such a powerful creature must be controlled and she will be… via an invasive memory-implantation program.

But the plan goes awry when the products of a top-secret project gone wrong, break out of the facility where they are being held and flee into the nearby city of Atlagos.

In the ensuing panic, the scientist in charge of implanting Ikoko’s memories inserts a program of her own making – one that teaches independence rather than obedience, and turns Ikoko into a modern-day African warrior – part Shaka Zulu, part Mino (“Dahomey Amazon”).

Ikoko must face monsters – of meat, metal and combinations of both – to save herself, those she’s tasked with protecting, and maybe even a world gone absolutely mad.

Initiate 16 is available NOW in e-book and paperback formats.

The Blacktasticon Kickstarter is LIVE!

The Blacktasticon Kickstarter is live! Support this Blacknificent gathering of the Black Fantastic today!

 

Afrofuturistic Comic Book, Jagunjagun Lewa, available NOW!

“Balogun Ojetade has created a fresh, imaginative and humorous tale in Jagunjagun Lewa. The story is filled with action and drama, a perfect display of Mr. Ojetade’s genre-blending style. I’m eager to see what happens next, and you will be, too.” —Milton Davis, Bestselling Author and Publisher
“The back story promises action and adventure…the artwork is phenomenal…and this comic actually had me laughing out loud. The action sequences are really well developed, where some comic fighting scenes can be hard to follow, this artist has done an amazing job in sequencing. Intelligent, comedic timing makes this book so much fun to read! I cannot wait for the next installment. Simply awesome!” —Jack Berberette, Founder of the DOTS RPG Project
“Beauty is power; a smile is its sword.”
The Gods of the Martial Arts gain power, prestige and wealth from the number of followers they possess. The Asian martial gods are most powerful and prosperous, as the Asian martial arts have long been marketed to humanity and are quite popular, even in the post-apocalyptic, afrofuturistic world of Jagunjagun Lewa.
The African gods of the martial arts, on the other hand, are so unpopular that they risk falling into eternal sleep. To save themselves, they pick an unlikely champion who, with his brother, Papio, a man cursed to live out his life as a mandrill, sets out to build the reputation and popularity of the African martial arts by defeating the best martial artists in the world. The problem is, no one wants to fight him – and NOT because of his extraordinary fighting skills.
Jagunjagun Lewa is set in a world of spring and gear technology, a world where the sword and spear are still kings of all weapons. It is a future much like, while also unlike, our past.
JAGUNJAGUN LEWA (“Pretty Warrior”) is a wild ride that will have you turning the pages and clamoring for more!
Issue #1 of this hilarious and action-packed comic book/manga, written and created by Balogun Ojetade and illustrated by Chris Miller, is available NOW in e-book and paperback formats!

The ATLiens TOC!

Known as the Nerdiest City in America and as the Hub of Speculative Fiction, few cities offer as much as Atlanta by way of the weird, the fantastical, the scary and the out right off the chain.

Atlanta also happens to be one of the Blackest cities in the world, so the anthology ATLiens had to happen.

Featuring fantastic and funky tales set in Atlanta by the authors from the ATL State of Black Speculative Fiction Creators Collective, ATLiens features a heavy dose of Urban Fantasy, a healthy helping of horror, with a little techno-thriller sprinkled in. All Blacktastic stories; all Blacktastic representation of the ATL.

Here is the TOC:

  1. Bomani and the Case of the Missing Monsters – Balogun Ojetade
  2. Play the Wraith – Azziza Sphinx (Jessica Hosten)
  3. Blerd and Confused – Alan Jones
  4. Piggyback – Milton Davis
  5. Not Your (Magical) Negro – Marcus Haynes
  6. Of Home and Hearth – Kortney Watkins
  7. My Dinner with Vlad – Kyoko M
  8. Another Day in the A – Violette L. Meier
  9. The Messiah Curse – Gerald L. Coleman

ATLiens releases very soon. Stay tuned!

Step Into A World: Portal Fantasy in Black Speculative Fiction

The “portal fantasy,” where somebody walks through a magical door (or wardrobe) into a fantasy world, has become a terrible cliche.
Nowadays, writers often begin describing their books by saying, “It’s not portal fantasy.” What most of them mean is that their portal fantasy stories don’t follow the old rules of the medium, such as those found in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, Alice in Wonderland or Wizard of Oz, in which the youthful protagonist(s) is sucked into an amazing alternate world.
Is Gamelit or its subgenre, LitRPG, portal fantasy? Not exactly. In most portal fantasy, the protagonist spends most of the book trying to find a way home. In Gamelit / LitRPG, however, after the protagonist enters the game world – usually through a digital or virtual portal – he or she usually spends most of the book trying to achieve some task, attain some item, or level up in the game world.
While many portal fantasy stories are cliché, some of the most powerful stories have been portal fantasies, including Pan’s Labyrinth. Even science fiction has gotten in on the action, such as the hit television series Fringe, with its portal between Earth and Alternate Earth.
What’s useful about the portal scenario is that it’s a quick and often beautiful way to signify that our characters have moved from the realm of the familiar into the unfamiliar. The problem comes in when authors refuse to question the definition of “familiar,” or build fantasy worlds that are unsustainable monocultures (“all women are slaves” or “everybody is happy here”).
Our lives are full of portals, both literal and figurative. We’ve divided up the planet into nations whose conceptual boundaries are magically concretized in maps, in fences, and more dangerous barriers. We enclose museums and universities and laboratories in buildings whose doors truly lead to alternate worlds where new things become possible. Every time you walk over the threshold of a library, or through a door into a party, you open yourself up to the strange and previously unknown. That’s what makes the portal such a powerful and enduring metaphor. It’s based on our everyday experience.
And, when done right, it takes us out of that everyday experience in unpredictable ways.
In Neil Gaiman’s Coraline, the portal isn’t a doorway to a better world, but a worse one. Here, a young girl discovers a secondary world that has a home eerily similar to her own from which she must rescue herself and the souls trapped by her “other mother.” The portal between our world and the other one is literally a doorway – a locked door in a downstairs room – bricked up but still the object of young Coraline’s curiosity, despite a warning to not go through it.
In science fiction, portals tend to be ways for characters to move great distances. The idea of a portal in a scientifically plausible setting inevitably leads to the idea of a “star gate” through which ships can travel vast distances in the blink of an eye.
A science-fiction book in which the portal is not meant to move people over great distances is The Shining Girls by Lauren Buekes. Here, a serial killer discovers the portal that allows him to move through time to perpetrate his dastardly deeds. This mechanism adds tension to an already-harrowing tale; how do you stop a killer who has the perfect getaway?
In my latest novel, The Beatdown, the heroine, Remi, enters the fantasy world of Ki Khanga through the Universal Reality Engine, a video game console that allows players to experience the game with all 14 senses. Here is the synopsis:
The coolest videogame you’ll ever READ!
“A Single Link NEVER Breaks!”
Remi Korede is a martial artist and a fan of THE BEATDOWN, a popular MMORPG set in the fantasy world of Ki Khanga.
In The Beatdown, players fight each other in the circles of sand and soil to prevent full-scale wars and the wrath of a vengeful Creator who almost destroyed the world when war on earth spilled over into the Heavens.
Players experience every punch, every throw, every kiss and every sip of honey wine in The Beatdown, so the stakes of every encounter, violent or not, are high.
After suffering a brutal assault at the hands of a martial arts champion in the game, Remi decides that, to gain closure and empowerment, she must face her attacker in the first professional fight between a man and a woman.
Remi, fighting as ‘The Single Link’ – because a single link never breaks – becomes a symbol to the people of Ki Khanga – a symbol of courage; of standing against oppression and discrimination; of freedom.
Join the fight in THE BEATDOWN, the epic tale that brings together the very best in Sword and Soul and Gamelit/LitRPG!
So, what is your favorite portal fantasy story?

Sword and Soul meets Cyberfunk in the Beatdown!

The coolest videogame you’ll ever READ!

“A Single Link NEVER Breaks!”

Remi Korede is a martial artist and a fan of The Beatdown, a popular MMORPG set in the fantasy world of Ki Khanga.

In The Beatdown, players fight each other in the circles of sand and soil to prevent full-scale wars and the wrath of a vengeful Creator who almost destroyed the world when war on earth spilled over into the Heavens.

Players experience every punch, every throw, every kiss and every sip of honey wine in The Beatdown, so the stakes of every encounter, violent or not, are high.

After suffering a brutal assault at the hands of a martial arts champion in the game, Remi decides that, to gain closure and empowerment, she must face her attacker in the first professional fight between a man and a woman.

Remi, fighting as ‘The Single Link’ – because a single link never breaks – becomes a symbol to the people of Ki Khanga – a symbol of courage; of standing against oppression and discrimination; of freedom.

Join the fight in THE BEATDOWN, the epic tale that brings together the very best in Sword and Soul and Gamelit/LitRPG! Available NOW!

Dembo’s Ditty Available NOW!

You are Dembo Daji, a Maroki – a Griot. But you weren’t always. You were once a struggling DJ in the near future. Home for you was a tiny efficiency in the Pittsburgh Projects – a 50-story housing development in the crime-ridden, ultra-violent area of Pittsburgh, in southwest Atlanta, Georgia… until you finally saved up enough credits to purchase the U.R.E. – the Universal Reality Engine – the world’s most popular gaming console and you decided to play Ki Khanga – the world’s most popular MMORPG – on it.

Now, you’re stuck in the world of Ki Khanga and looking for a way out.

All isn’t bad, though. You’re in love with Joni, a beautiful and brilliant princess. But in order to win her hand in marriage, you have to first win over her father, who demands his daughter marry someone of great fame and fortune. Becoming the official Maroki of Yoro Mosa, the hero of heroes, is the best way to do it. The problem is, Yoro’s life is fraught with dangers. Hordes of evil, intelligent chimpanzees, sorcerers, gargantuan monsters are just some of the terrible things you’ll have to face if you get the gig.

This gamebook is similar to the Choose Your Own-type books, but with cool game stats, weapons, skills and funky spell-songs to choose from!

Hack, slash, talk and sing your way out of trouble and into fame and glory as you choose your path through a hilarious and dangerous LitRPG adventure!

Dembo’s Ditty is available in paperback and e-book formats.

When Afrofuturism Meets Sword & Soul! Why YOU should be reading LitRPG

A short while ago, an author I had not yet heard of joined the State of Black Science Fiction Facebook Group. After introducing himself, the brother – Dr. Aleron Kong – informed us that he was the “Father of LitRPG.” Someone in the group asked “What, exactly, is LitRPG?” Dr. Kong just said “It’s a cool new genre of science fiction that mashes up MMORPG video gaming with fantasy or science fiction settings and elements,” and he posted a link to his Amazon page. As a writer of cyoa-style and Fighting Fantasy-style gamebooks and as co-creator of a roleplaying game with quite a bit of buzz, I considered myself in the know about anything in literature that has something to do with gaming.

“New genre?” I scoffed. “We’ll see.” Out of curiosity, I checked it out. “I’ll be damn,” I said, perusing pages of Kong’s The Land: Founding. “I have NEVER read anything like this!”

And thus, my journey down the rabbit hole that is LitRPG began.

Wait… what? “What, exactly IS LitRPG,” you ask?

While LitRPG is still developing, so many people have their own ideas, the good folks over at LitRPG Forum provide us with a clear and concise definition:

“LitRPG is a literary genre where games or game-like challenges form an essential part of the landscape. A LitRPG work simultaneously narrates the story of characters inside and outside of the game-world.

At least some of the characters in a LitRPG novel therefore understand that they are playing a game: they are ‘meta-aware’. So, while Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings is a fantasy novel, a book about people creating avatars and interacting in a Lord of the Rings MMORPG would be a LitRPG novel.”

As LitRPG Forum founder, Paul Bellow says, when you add game mechanics – especially stats, experience, and leveling – to science-fiction or fantasy, you get LitRPG, which is shorthand for Literary RPG or Literary Role-Playing Games.

Think the manga and anime, Sword Art Online or the Jumanji book and films.

In Sword Art Online, NerveGear – a helmet that stimulates the user’s five senses via their brain – allows players to experience and control their in-game characters with their minds. Both the game and the NerveGear was created by Akihiko Kayaba.

One day, 10,000 players log into the SAO’s mainframe cyberspace for the first time, only to discover that they are unable to log out. Kayaba appears and tells the players that they must beat all 100 floors of Aincrad, a steel castle which is the setting of SAO, if they wish to be free. Those who suffer in-game deaths or forcibly remove the NerveGear out-of-game will suffer real-life deaths.

Jumanji is a 1995 American fantasy adventure film. It is an adaptation of the 1981 children’s book of the same name by Chris Van Allsburg.

The story centers on young Alan Parrish, who becomes trapped in a board game while playing with his best friend Sarah Whittle in 1969. Twenty-six years later, siblings Judy and Peter Shepherd find the game, begin playing and then unwittingly release the now-adult Alan. After tracking down Sarah, the quartet resolves to finish the game in order to reverse all of the destruction it has caused.

As far as the origins of formally calling the genre LitRPG, that began in Russia. Its first translations appeared around 2010, triggering a wave of fan fiction from new Russian authors who came up with a name for the new genre: LitRPG.

Three published authors became the founders of the genre: D. Rus, V. Mahanenko and D. Mikhailov. All three originally contributed their series to Russia’s bestselling “LitRPG” project which is published by EKSMO, Russia’s biggest publishing house, since 2013.

The word “LitRPG” as the project’s title was suggested by the project’s producer Alex Bobl in a brainstorming session with V. Mahanenko and EKSMO’s science fiction editor-in-chief Dmitry Malkin.

Now LitRPG has gained popularity all over the world.

While there are hundreds of good books in the genre and many great ones, I will introduce you to a few, along with their authors:

 

The Land: Founding, by Aleron Kong

In The Land: Founding, the first volume of the award winning Chaos Seeds saga, by physician, “Father of American LitRPG,” and founder of LitRPG.com, the Exiles and Eternals toy with the lives of unwitting humans. Gamers sign away their souls in unread contracts as they log online each day. One at a time, these people are stolen, mind and soul, into a world of magic and adventure that operates by the same laws as the game they worshiped at for years.

 

Goblin: A LitRPG Novel, by Paul Bellow

Sarah, Eric and Josh secretly log onto the new Tower of Gates VRMMORPG and stumble on a world unlike any they have seen before. Swords, sorcery, and intrigue abound. While not planning on staying in the unreleased game long, life happens.

They soon learn the stakes are even higher than they imagined. To survive, they will need all their strength, courage, and wisdom, not to mention help from friendly NPCs, magic items, and everything else uncovered as they delve deeper into the game.

One more level becomes a matter of life and death. A great read from the founder of LitRPG Forum and LitRPG Reads.

 

Adventures on Terra – Book 1: Beginnings, by R.A. Mejia

Armon Ellington is a nineteen year old kid that always felt out of place. He’s an orphan, a gamer, and a role playing game geek. When he dies after a seventy-two hour gaming marathon, instead of going to an afterlife, he’s transported to a new world, governed by rules that are eerily similar to the RPG games he loves. On this new world, Terra, he can be anything he wants, a warrior, mage, or even a crafter. Only, Armon wants more than that, he also wants friends and family.

Join Armon on his journey through this amazing new world where he’ll go on adventures, explore dungeons, slay monsters and hopefully find the friends and family he never had on earth. This is an excellent work from the founder and host of the LitRPG Podcast.

 

Dembo’s Ditty, by Balogun Ojetade

You are Dembo Daji, a Maroki – a Griot. But you weren’t always. You were once a struggling DJ in the near future. Home for you was a tiny efficiency in the Pittsburgh Projects – a 50-story housing development in the crime-ridden, ultra-violent area of Pittsburgh, in southwest Atlanta, Georgia… until you finally saved up enough credits to purchase the U.R.E. – the Universal Reality Engine – the world’s most popular gaming console and you decided to play Ki Khanga – the world’s most popular MMORPG – on it.

Now, you’re stuck in the world of Ki Khanga and looking for a way out.

All isn’t bad, though. You’re in love with Joni, a beautiful and brilliant princess. But in order to win her hand in marriage, you have to first win over her father, who demands his daughter marry someone of great fame and fortune. Becoming the official Maroki of Yoro Mosa, the hero of heroes, is the best way to do it. The problem is, Yoro’s life is fraught with dangers. Hordes of evil, intelligent chimpanzees, sorcerers, gargantuan monsters are just some of the terrible things you’ll have to face if you get the gig.

This gamebook is similar to the Choose Your Own-type books, but with cool game stats, weapons, skills and funky spell-songs to choose from!

Hack, slash, talk and sing your way out of trouble and into fame and glory as you choose your path through a hilarious and dangerous LitRPG adventure!

If Afrofuturism and Sword and Soul had a baby full of the Funk, Dembo’s Ditty would be its name! The gamebook is set in Ki Khanga, the African analogue that is the world of the popular tabletop Role-Playing Game and anthology of the same name.

Pick up a LitRPG book today, but be warned… you WON’T be able to put it down; you’ll be having too much fun. So, if you’re the type of person who hates sunsets and dolphins and frowns whenever a baby giggles, LitRPG might not be the genre for you. Everybody else, run and go read some LitRPG!

Why Your Child Loves Zombies And What YOU Can Do About It

When I was a child, the things in fiction and films that most terrified children and adults alike were giant bugs, aliens, and possession or replacement by a demonic spirit, ghost or some other type of “body-snatcher.” However, Zombies have always been there too, lurking in the shadows, at times replacing one of the top three.

Today, Zombies may not be the most feared things in fiction and film, but they are certainly one of the most popular, especially with children, who are not afraid of zombies like back when I was young.

Zombies are flesh-eating undead people – usually with bloated or decaying gray bodies who will stop at nothing to locate and eat the flesh of living human beings. Not something I would have ever thought children would like.

But times are changing.

Zombies are now seen everywhere – on children’s TV channels, as heroes in PG and PG-13 movies, and in books and graphic novels. Zombies have become more mainstream than ever before.

So what makes them so appealing to children these days?

I asked my son, Oluade, who is 14 years old that question. He said “I can’t really speak for children (oops, momentarily forgot he’s 14 – “a young man,” he quickly points out), but a lot of teens are into zombies because they aren’t really THAT scary. They walk slowly and are dumb. They are more funny than anything! The really scary stuff in zombie shows like Z-Nation and The Walking Dead are the people.”

“What about fast zombies, like in World War Z?” I asked.

He shook his head as his eyes widened. “Now, those mugs are scary!”

When I was a child, zombies were portrayed as unstoppable forces of unnatural death. People in zombie movies always died. It wasn’t until I saw Dawn of the Dead that I was exposed to the concept of people beating the zombies through ingenuity and luck.

Today though, zombies are little more than walking targets. Movies and video games of the 21st Century relish in showing people come out on top of the zombies.

I know some folks might think zombies are inappropriate for children. I’d argue that I am much happier that my children aren’t afraid of zombies. I don’t want my children to be afraid of anything.

Zombies are here to stay. And not just for grownups. Paranorman, Nightmare Before Christmas, Beetlejuice… there are so many movies out there with the undead presented in a way not to give your children nightmares.

If you have a child that’s afraid of zombies, I highly recommend you cure them. Let them read – and play –  Siafu vs. The Horde, the action-packed, fun and exciting 2nd volume in the Black Power: The Superhero Gamebook series in which YOU are a superhero!

Just like in the bestselling gamebook, Siafu Saves the World, in Book 2:

YOU choose how the story unfolds.

YOU choose how the story ends.

YOU have 4 Superpower Archetypes to choose from!

And YOU have new Mega-Powers to choose from and develop!

In this gamebook YOU must face, The Horde, superheroes turned walking dead, bent on “Making America Great” by turning all super-powered beings into zombies… or eating them.

Solve puzzles, gather clues, bring evil to justice and stop the rampaging Horde with your superpowers, the help of your 1st cousin, Big ‘Lo and cameos from characters from Siafu Saves the World!

Siafu vs. The Horde is available in e:book and paperback formats.