Ki KhangaThank you, to each and every one of you for deciding to join our journey to Ki Khanga!

We are less than $200 dollars from those custom playing cards for this exciting game!

Excitement over the cards has led to much discussion about playing cards as of late.

Playing cards, used for games and magic, are so familiar, and so beloved, yet we know very little about the way we perceive and think about them. Are some cards more memorable than others? Are some easier to identify?

Recently, a study was conducted that tested if some playing cards are easier to spot than others.

Ki KhangaNinety-six students were shown visual streams of 26 playing cards on a computer, each displayed for a tenth of a second, and they had to say if a certain target card was present in the stream or not. The students detected the Ace of Spades more easily than any other card, and they detected Aces in general more easily than other cards – probably because of their simple, distinct pattern.

Surprisingly, face cards – Jacks, Queens, Kings and Jokers – were no easier to spot than number cards, despite being more distinctive. Another curious finding was the students’ particular tendency to say the two red sixes (Six of Hearts and Six of Diamonds) were present when they were not. It is not clear why.

Ki KhangaTo test how memorable particular cards are, another study was done. The students saw a stream of cards, each displayed for a quarter of a second, and then they were asked to say whether a particular card had been in the stream or not. Again, the Ace of Spades especially, and all Aces to a lesser extent, were more memorable than other cards.

What about likeability? Students were shown pairs of cards and in each case had to say which they preferred. Regarding numerical value, the participants liked the highest (10) and lowest (2) cards the most. And they had a tendency to prefer Spades and Hearts over Clubs and Diamonds – maybe because of their rank in games, or their curved shape. Two cards were especially popular – the Ace of Hearts and the King of Hearts. There was also a gender difference in taste. Men tended to prefer higher value cards and women to prefer lower value cards.

Ki KhangaFinally, the researchers looked at the verbal and visual accessibility of cards. To do this they asked a new batch of hundreds of students to “Name a playing card” or to “Visualize a playing card” and then say which it was. There was a strong bias for naming the Ace of Spades, followed by the Queen of Hearts and then other high-ranking cards. When participants chose a number card, there was a bias for naming 3s and 7s the most and 6s the least (a phenomenon well known by magicians). Overall, cards from the Spades and Hearts were named more than the other two suits. There was a gender difference again: men tended to name the Queen of Hearts more than women, and women more often named the King of Hearts than men. These same results were pretty much repeated when participants were asked to visualize a card before naming it.

Which playing card do YOU like best?

When you play Ki Khanga: The Sword and Soul Role-Playing Game, will you play with a standard deck of playing cards, or with the custom Ki Khanga playing cards?

Ki Khanga

About Balogun

Balogun is the author of the bestselling Afrikan Martial Arts: Discovering the Warrior Within and screenwriter / producer / director of the films, A Single Link, Rite of Passage: Initiation and Rite of Passage: The Dentist of Westminster. He is one of the leading authorities on Steamfunk – a philosophy or style of writing that combines the African and / or African American culture and approach to life with that of the steampunk philosophy and / or steampunk fiction – and writes about it, the craft of writing, Sword & Soul and Steampunk in general, at https://chroniclesofharriet.com/. He is author of eight novels – the Steamfunk bestseller, MOSES: The Chronicles of Harriet Tubman (Books 1 & 2); the Urban Science Fiction saga, Redeemer; the Sword & Soul epic, Once Upon A Time In Afrika; a Fight Fiction, New Pulp novella, Fist of Afrika; the gritty, Urban Superhero series, A Single Link and Wrath of the Siafu; the two-fisted Dieselfunk tale, The Scythe and the “Choose-Your-Own-Destiny”-style Young Adult novel, The Keys. Balogun is also contributing co-editor of two anthologies: Ki: Khanga: The Anthology and Steamfunk. Finally, Balogun is the Director and Fight Choreographer of the Steamfunk feature film, Rite of Passage, which he wrote based on the short story, Rite of Passage, by author Milton Davis and co-author of the award winning screenplay, Ngolo. You can reach him on Facebook at www.facebook.com/Afrikan.Martial.Arts; on Twitter @Baba_Balogun and on Tumblr at www.tumblr.com/blog/blackspeculativefiction.

2 responses »

  1. Wow! Those are some cool playing cards! I love the artwork. I would love to get those.

  2. Fujimoto says:

    These cards have fantastic artwork. They will be an amazing addition to the game.

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